Two Course Resources Review

This week at Walden University I was tasked with finding course resources from the Walden library database on topics of: the brain and learning, information processing theory, and problem solving methods during the learning process. Below are the two articles of choice, their reference, and a brief summarization of the articles.

Examples of instructional design for social studies according to meaningful learning and information processing theories.

The article provides instructional design examples (from theory to practical application) and the results based off of the evaluation of the examples. Babadogan and Unal analyze Gagne’s Information Processing Theory and Ausubel’s Meaningful Learning Theory and relate the theories in a practical application by creating instructional design models “for in-class activities of the social studies course”. The authors dynamically compare and contrast the theories in a social studies environment and provide real world examples of how instructional design models can be made utilized in this setting.

Reference

Bagadogan, C. & Unal, F. (2011). Examples of instructional design for social studies according to meaningful learning and information processing theories. Procedia. Social and Behavioral Sciences. Retrieved from: http://ac.els-cdn.com.ezp.waldenulibrary.org/S1877042811006161/1-s2.0-S1877042811006161-main.pdf?_tid=2ef848f4-1c86-11e3-ba0f-00000aacb361&acdnat=1379085019_fe01d053357dd07635d9fce3d2bf59e6. September 12, 2013.

The Brain: Utilizing multi-sensory approaches for individual learning styles.

Ormrod, Schunk, & Gredler have stated that “efforts to teach to the ‘left brain’ or ‘right brain’ are ultimately in vain because the two hemispheres collaborate in virtually every task and activity” (2009, pg. 47). Scientists believe the Corpus Collosum, the nerve tissue which separates the right and left hemisphere, is the last tissue in the brain to mature and could be a deciding factor in proper or improper transfer of information between hemispheres. Mr. Christie contends that the brain could draw more “nueral pathway stimulation” by teaching with multi-sensory techniques. Mr. Christie provides specific examples to be creative in the classroom to achieve this multi-sensory overload to promote better transfer of information between the two hemispheres.

Reference

Christie, S. B. (2000). The brain: Utilizing multi-sensory approaches for individual learning styles. Education, 121(2), 327-330. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/196428046?accountid=14872

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